Two Little Boys

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Two Little BoysAlso available on Blu-Ray

Black comedy about Nige, his best mate Deano, and their inept efforts to cover up an accidental death after a hit and run. Stars Flight of the Conchords' Bret McKenzie and Hamish & Andy's Hamish Blake. Directed by Robert Sarkies (ScarfiesOut of the Blue), based on a novel written by his brother Duncan.

Nige (McKenzie) runs over and accidently kills a Scandinavian soccer star in an unfortunate incident involving a hot meat pie, a ginger cat and a policeman. He chucks the body in a nearby road-works hole and runs to his best mate of 15 years, Deano (Blake). But Deano's not the guy you should turn to in a crisis...

Starring
Bret McKenzie, Hamish Blake, Maaka Pohatu, Filip Berg, Russell Smith, Erin Banks, Lee Hatherly, Jarin Towney, Charlie Britzman, Ian Mune

Directed by
Robert Sarkies ('Out of the Blue', 'Scarfies')

Written by
Duncan Sarkies, Robert Sarkies

Festivals & Awards
Winner Best Editing and Best Visual Effects at the NZ Film Awards 2012.

(R15) contains offensive language and several scenes may offend | Comedy | New Zealand | Official Website


USER REVIEWS

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Average rating 2 Stars out of a possible 5 Stars


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2 Stars out of a possible 5 Stars

not overly funny

Reviewed by rainbow

PRESS REVIEWS

Average rating 4 Stars out of a possible 5 Stars


Keeping Up With NZ

A riotous tale that is incredibly entertaining and very tongue-in-cheek and I enjoyed every minute of it.

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National Radio (Graeme Tuckett)

A very, very dark comedy. Absolutely filthy-minded, laugh-out-loud funny.

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NZ Herald (Russell Baillie)

There's still something weirdly compelling about it, care of the performances (Blake's especially) and its portrait of mateship gone mad.

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Sunday Star-Times (Kate Mead)

Bad clothes, even worse hair and Suzie Clarkson's The New Zealand Fit Kit populate an early 1990s' Invercargill. The cringe-worthy comedy is amplified by Nige (Bret McKenzie) and Deano (Hamish Blake) - two bogans whose friendship is hanging by a thread...

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Variety (USA)

The title of the 1993-set kiwi bromance 'Two Little Boys' is a good indication of its level of humor, which is so juvenile and obvious the only period-appropriate thing missing is a laugh track.

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Yahoo! (New Zealand)

A wee gem of Kiwi film-making on the big screen - and judging by the chuckles around the cinema, I wasn't alone in that sentiment.

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Flicks.co.nz "Two Little Boys" Movie Review

Flicks.co.nz rating


Liam Maguren, Flicks.co.nz

With Scarfies, Out of the Blue and his episodes of grievously-overlooked sci-fi series This is not My Life, Robert Sarkies (along with his writing sibling Duncan) is a Kiwi filmmaking treasure. Sadly, the brothers’ return to black comedy does not add anything to their reputation.

While their relationship is central to the film, we hardly ever get to see blissful idiot Nige (Bret McKenzie) and Deano (Hamish Blake) as actual mates, making it difficult to care about their bloke-mantic relationship and, consequently, Two Little Boys’ murder cover-up scenario. For a good 95% of the film, they’re at each other’s necks, fuelled by the bruv triangle completed by Nige’s new BFF Gav. This conflict wouldn’t be a bad thing had the pair’s back-and-forth banter been funny. But while their repartee never feels obnoxious or overtly offensive, there’s simply not enough humour to complement the script’s f-bombardment.

Making his feature debut, Maaka Pohatu is a loveable standout as the big-hearted Gav. His happily naïve presence is a welcome relief from the leads’ constant bickering. Bret and Hamish also show some natural on-screen chemistry but it’s unfortunate that the material they have to work with doesn’t reach the level of their performances.

The Sarkies use the Catlins to give the early 90s New Zealand a relatable, homely charm. It’s a pity they couldn’t do the same for Deano and Nige. With the exception of the climax, Two Little Boys beats down any sense of fun and wit it could potentially have with its hard-to-like characters and adolescent dialogue.


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