Melancholia

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MelancholiaAlso available on Blu-Ray

Iconoclastic Danish director Lars von Trier follows up his controversial Antichrist with this sci-fi disaster drama, starring Kirsten Dunst, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Kiefer Sutherland.

A disaster film, of sorts, Melancholia tells the story of two sisters coming to terms with the imminent death of the planet as a large foreign body takes up a collision course. Justine (Dunst) becomes melancholic and calm when Earth is threatened, meanwhile Claire (Gainsbourg) fears for her life.

Von Trier considers his previous films to have happy endings, and promises ominously that this will be the first with an unhappy one. 

Starring
Kirsten Dunst, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Kiefer Sutherland, Charlotte Rampling, John Hurt, Alexander Skarsgård, Stellan Skarsgård, Brady Corbet, Udo Kier

Directed by
Lars von Trier ('Antichrist', 'Dogville', 'Dancer in the Dark', 'Breaking the Waves')

Written by
Lars von Trier

Festivals & Awards
Winner of Best Actress (Dunst) at Cannes Film Festival 2011.

(M) contains offensive language & nudity | Drama, Science Fiction, Thriller | Denmark, Sweden, France, Germany, Italy | English | Official Website


USER REVIEWS

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Average rating 3 Stars out of a possible 5 Stars


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I love it!
4 Stars out of a possible 5 Stars

i for some strange reason, loved this movie. I saw it at the movies and it brought this sense of melancholia over the whole crowd. So it must be pretty powerful. definitely recommend it for a moving night in.

Reviewed by alicia
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2 Stars out of a possible 5 Stars

Yup, that'll do it. You have my aprpeciatoin.

Reviewed by Ramazan

PRESS REVIEWS

Average rating 4 Stars out of a possible 5 Stars


A.V. Club (USA)

Though it lacks the titanic emotion of von Trier’s best films, Melancholia makes it up in stomach-churning dread as the planet inches ever closer to Earth.

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Chicago Sun-Times (Roger Ebert)

Von Trier has never made a more realistic domestic drama.

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Empire (UK)

Audacious, beautiful, tactful filmmaking.

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Entertainment Weekly (USA)

A giant achievement.

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Hollywood Reporter

This contemplation of the planet’s demise predictably provides not an ounce of comfort or redemption, nor does it offer characters or ideas with which to meaningfully engage, just ample opportunity to wallow in some rapturous images, glorious music and a foul mood.

Click to read full review.
Little White Lies (UK)

Melancholia is incredibly eerie, and is lent an exciting frisson by the authenticity of an actress and filmmaker with first-hand experiences of psychological trauma.

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Total Film (UK)

Beginning and ending with a bang, but with too much whimpering in between, Melancholia is low-key Lars.

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Variety (USA)

The gentlest depiction of annihilation one could imagine.

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Flicks.co.nz "Melancholia" Movie Review

Flicks.co.nz rating


Steve Newall, Flicks.co.nz

The opening sequences of Melancholia show that Lars Von Trier has picked up right where Antichrist left off – thankfully just in a visual rather than literal sense as I don’t think the world’s exactly itching for a sequel. Super slow motion surrealism makes up the opening several minutes with another gorgeous assemblage of images that will no doubt form the unlikely basis for television commercial art direction, as its predecessor did. After this beautiful and foreboding foreshadowing, Melancholia moves on to the classy-as-all-hell wedding of Kirsten Dunst and Alexander Skarsgård (True Blood) and soon it becomes clear there may be a little more Antichrist lurking within than had first appeared.

Melancholia is based on Von Trier’s personal experiences but, rather than the tumultuous aspects of grief and depression, this is more about how those that suffer from it are able to self-destruct amid an eerie aura of calm. That eeriness and calm comes to the fore in Melancholia’s second part (the wedding being the first), opening at the film’s deepest point of depression and introducing apocalyptic themes as a rogue planet, previously hidden behind the sun, threatens to collide with Earth.

Pitched as a beautiful movie about the end of the world, Melancholia succeeds. Dunst, in particular, excels in a performance that saw her collect Best Actress at Cannes, while the less that’s said of the Von Trier witch-hunt at that festival the better.


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